Skip to main content

 David Krayesky, Ph. D. - Assistant Professor 

 

SPOTLIGHT

I am a phycologist trained in the taxonomy of marine red algae (Rhodophyta).  I also have a strong interest in the taxonomy and evolution of bryophytes.  My main research interests focus on the diversity, systematics and evolution of non-calcified crustose red algae.  The Peyssonneliales is one of my favorite crustose groups. In my research I utilize both classical and molecular techniques to clarify species limits and define higher level taxonomic relationships.  My other research interests include elucidating evolutionary relationships within the Florideophyte algae.  

EDUCATION

Ph.D.,  Env. Biol. & Evol.  Univ. of Louisiana at Lafayette

M.S.,   Plant Biology        Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale

B.S.,    Env. Science        Johnson State College 

COURSE ASSIGNMENTS

RESEARCH INTERESTS

The systematics and evolution of Macroalgae with a focus the red algae.  The present focus of my research is in testing generic and species concepts based on comparative morphological and anatomical studies, including type species, in conjuction with molecular and phylogentic analyses.  This combination has enabled me to answer systematic and evolutionary questions of superficially similar species, including overlooked taxa, within estuarine and deepwater groups of red algae.  My research targets the systematics of the estuarine genus Caloglossa and members of the intertidal and deepwater Order Peyssonneliales.  The both Caloglossa and Peyssonnelia are also ecologically important genera of red algae as they are important food to wildlife and structural components in mangroves and coral reefs, respectively.  The basic premise of my research is to understand the systematics, taxonomy and evolution of these groups of red algae in these threatened marine and brackish water ecosystems.   

 

Contact Information

300K Vincent Science Center

Phone: 724-738-2477

Fax: 724-738-4782 

david.krayesky@sru.edu

  

PUBLICATIONS

PRESENTATIONS

 

 

 

STUDENT RESEARCH