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 Women's Studies Inspirational Quotes   

 

SPOTLIGHT

"I've yet to be on a campus where most women weren't worrying about some aspect of combining marriage, children, and a career.  I've yet to find one where many men were worrying about the same thing."  -Gloria Steinem

History is "herstory" too.  -Author Unknown

 "If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, together women ought to be able to turn it right side up again."  -Sojourner Truth (1851)

"The thing women have yet to learn is nobody gives you power.  You just take it."  -Roseanne Barr

"Being a woman is a terribly difficult task, since it consists principally in dealing with men."  -Joseph Conrad

"You don't have to be anti-man to be pro-woman."  -Jane Galvin Lewis

"Taught from infancy that beauty is woman's sceptre, the mind shapes itself to the body, and roaming round its gilt cage, only seeks to adorn its prison."  -Mary Wollstonecraft

 

Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman Hughes, circa 1970 Photograph by Dan Wynn.

"For the four or five years surrounding the birth of Ms., I was traveling and speaking as a team with a black feminist partner: first Dorothy Pitman Hughes, a child-care pioneer, then lawyer Florynce Kennedy, and finally activist Margaret Sloan. By speaking together at hundreds of public meetings, we hoped to widen a public image of the women's movement created largely by its first homegrown media event, The Feminine Mystique.... Despite the many early reformist virtues of The Feminine Mystique, it had managed to appear at the height of the civil rights movement with almost no reference to black women or other women of color. It was most relevant to the problems of the white well-educated suburban homemakers who were standing by their kitchen sinks justifiably wondering if there weren't 'more to life than this.' As a result, white-middle-class movement had become the catch phrase of journalists describing feminism in the United States..., and divisions among women were still deep."

Gloria Steinem, Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions (1983), pp. 5-6