Skip to main content

 Population 

 

SPOTLIGHT

 

Population

Global Challenges

Trend One:  Understand global demographic differences and population changes that impact political, environmental, and economic stability.    

Slippery Rock University is committed to act upon the institutional and educational challenges of these global trends, preparing students in the sciences, humanities, arts, health and human services, business, and education.  The university recognizes its mission to provide meaningful educational opportunities that produce informed, globally-invested citizens who make meaningful personal and professional contributions to the global community.

In order to accomplish this, SRU will establish a living and learning environment that encourages the engagement of students in a global community; be recognized for undergraduate and graduate academic programs that support the global community; be recognized as a preferred workplace where faculty and staff participate in professional, scholarly, and personal growth opportunities that support engagement in and competencies related to global trends; and provide educational opportunities to existing and emerging nontraditional learning communities, including alumni, community members, and retirees. 

SRU Goal:  
Slippery Rock University will establish a living and learning environment that encourages the engagement of students in a global community.

ACTION        
Expand opportunities and dedicate resources for international students to study at Slippery Rock University.

BASELINE    
Identify international students as a discreet group from “out-of-state” students and begin documenting in fall 2010.

ACTION        
Develop new and existing opportunities for internships, travel and study abroad programs.

MEASURE    
Number of students participating in global internships, travel and study abroad programs.

BASELINE    
282 students in 15 countries (2004)

UPDATE        
331 students in 20 countries; 122 studied abroad (2007)

UPDATE        
333 students in 20 countries; 112 studied abroad (2008)

UPDATE        
426 students in 18 countries; 112 studied abroad (2009)

UPDATE        
420 students in 28 countries; 114 studied abroad (2010)

STRATEGIES: 
Promote a comprehensive learning experience that combines classroom instruction with service learning, experiential learning, and extracurricular activities to produce informed, globally-invested citizens who contribute in meaningful personal and professional ways to the global community.

SRU Goal:      
Slippery Rock University will continuously improve the quality and value of its academic degrees, intellectual products and programs. 

ACTION        
Slippery Rock University faculty and staff will collaborate to create learning opportunities for students to apply their classroom knowledge to real world situations. 

MEASURE    
Number of opportunities created for students

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: Action statements targeting an application of classroom knowledge to "real world situations" would provide an opportunity to measure outcomes for students "who contribute in meaningful personal and professional ways to the global community."

ACTION          
Promote academic and cultural arts activities – such as Kaleidoscope Festival, Luna Fest, and fine arts programs that foster awareness of regional, national, and global issues and cultures. 

BASELINE      
Public Relations publications and news articles showcasing events

SRU Goal:     
Create an environment conducive to student growth and development in areas of leadership, civic engagement and professional preparation. 

Develop living and learning opportunities that are integrated through residential programs such as community development activities and Living-Learning Communities to encourage global citizenship and the interaction of domestic and international students across national, cultural, and experiential lines.

Engage all students in the development of leadership skills required in the context of global trends through programs such as the Compass Leadership Program, the Freshman Leadership Scholars Program, centralized Peer Leader Campus Wide Training, Club & Organization Student Leader Training, and community service opportunities.

ACTION        
Develop a student leadership certification process to ensure that all students meet basic competencies in leadership skills and to provide advanced certification for those who choose to pursue additional experience. (SL)

MEASURE    
Students participating in the advanced leadership certification process.

BASELINE    
One of five students completed the Advanced Leadership Certification program prior to the end of the spring 2007 semester.  A leadership certification process is developed for implementation in a collaborative effort between the Center for Student Involvement and Leadership and the FYRST seminar program. Beginning in August 2007 students can achieve certification at varying levels: leadership, emerging leadership, and advanced leadership.
(Spring 2007)

UPDATE        
The Center for Student Involvement & Leadership launched the leadership certification program, Compass Leadership Program, with 478 students enrolled for initial year (6.3% of the 7585 undergraduate population), 336 students received Level 1 certification, 13 students received Level 2 certification, 4 students were paired with a faculty/staff mentor and received Level 3 certification. Ten sections of the FYRST Seminar collaborated with the Compass Leadership Program and enrolled 248 students in Level 1; 191 FYRST Seminar students completed the requirements and received Level 1 certification. 
(Spring 2008)

UPDATE        
Currently, 1168 students are enrolled in the Compass Leadership Program (15.2% of the undergraduate population), a 9% increase from last year.  835 received Level 1 Certification, 336 received Level 1 certification in 2008; 33 students received Level 2 Certification, 13 students received Level 2 Certification in 2008; 8 students were paired with faculty/staff mentors and received Level 3 certification compared with 4 students last year. 
(Spring 2009)

UPDATE        
Currently, 1928 students are enrolled in the Compass Leadership Program (22% of the undergraduate population), which is a 6.8% increase from last year.  850 students received Level 1 Certification, compared to 835 last year; 56 students received Level 2 Certification, compared to 33 last year; 12 students were paired with faculty/staff mentors and received Level 3 certification compared with 8 students last year. 
(Spring 2010)

UPDATE 
Currently, 2,247 students are enrolled in the Compass Leadership Program (27.9% of the undergraduate population), which  is a 6% increase from last year.  991 students received Level 1 Certification, compared to 850 last year; 173 students received Level 2 Certification, compared to 56 last year; 14 students were paired with faculty/staff mentors and received Level 3 certification compared with 12 students last year.
(Spring 2011)

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE:  Subcommittee recommends additional statements to measure other leadership development programs and accommodation of global leadership competencies within the structure of the Compass Leadership Program.

STRATEGIES:  Safeguard a core liberal education program that provides the breadth of knowledge, skills, and values expected of an educated person in our global community.

STRATEGIES:  Slippery Rock University will establish a living and learning environment that provides for development of the total person.

 

Steering Committee  

President Cheryl J. Norton
Dr. Philip Way
Ms. Molly Mercer
Dr. Robert Watson
Ms. Barbara Ender
Ms. Rita Abent
Ms. Tina Moser
Mr. Eliott Baker
Dr. Nancy Barta-Smith
Ms. Carrie Birckbichler
Dr. John Bonando
Dr. Patrick Burkhart (APSCUF)
Dr. Patti Campbell
Mr. Herb Carlson
Dr. Jerry Chmielewski
Mr. Rogers Clements (SGA)
Dr. Cornelius Cosgrove
Ms. Lorraine Craven
Dr. Keith Dils

Dr. Thomas Flynn 
Dr. Susan Hannam
Ms. Mary Hennessey
Dr. Athula Herat
Ms. Samantha Kelly
Ms. Mary Ann King
Mr. Paul Lueken
Dr. Jeffrey Lynn
Ms. Holly McCoy
Ms. Lynne Motyl
Dr. Randall Nichols
Dr. Paula Olivero
Ms. Deb Pincek
Dr. Katrina Quinn

Mr. Regis Schiebel
Ms. Kelly Sladden (ARHS)
Dr. Langdon Smith
Dr. Steven Strain
Ms. Melissa Teodoro
Mr. Philip Tramdack
Dr. Eva Tsuquiashi-Daddesio
Mr. Tom Watson (AFSCME)
Dr. Amanda Yale