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 Strategic Planning Trend 1 

 

SPOTLIGHT

Changing Population Dynamics  

As the world population continues to grow 8,700 people every hour, 145 people every minute, and 2.4 people every second, demographic changes will require creative responses on the part of nations, cultures, and educators. Changing population dynamics include:

  • Burgeoning population in the developing world. The population of the developing world is expected to grow by 49 percent between now and 2025.
  • Continued international immigration from the developing to the developed world.
  • Aging of the global population. Global elderly population is expected to exceed the population under 15 years of age in 2047. In addition to related concerns about a sustainable workforce, the aging of the global population requires reconsideration of social and economic resources from health and medical services to education, recreation, and geriatric services.
  • Increasing rates of disability, particularly in those over the age of 50.
  • Increasing urbanization, particularly in the developing world. Growing urban populations will stress infrastructure (utilities, transportation, public services) as well as essential life systems of food production and water quality.1

Slippery Rock University is committed to act upon the institutional and educational challenges of these global trends, preparing students in the sciences, humanities, arts, health and human services, business, and education. The university recognizes its mission to provide meaningful educational opportunities that produce informed, globally-invested citizens who make meaningful personal and professional contributions to the global community.

In order to accomplish this, SRU will establish a living and learning environment that encourages the engagement of students in a global community; be recognized for undergraduate and graduate academic programs that support the global community; be recognized as a preferred workplace where faculty and staff participate in professional, scholarly, and personal growth opportunities that support engagement in and competencies related to global trends; and provide educational opportunities to existing and emerging nontraditional learning communities, including alumni, community members, and retirees.

OBJECTIVE:  Slippery Rock University will establish a living and learning environment that encourages the engagement of students in a global community.

ACTION:      Expand opportunities and dedicate resources for international students to study at SRU.
MEASURE:   Headcount enrollments and credit hours generated in fall terms.
BASELINE:   Identify international students as a discreet group from “out-of-state” students and begin documenting in fall 2010.
 
ACTION:      Develop new and existing opportunities for internships, travel and study abroad programs.
MEASURE:   Number of students participating in global internships, travel and study abroad programs.
BASELINE:   2006-302 students participated
UPDATE:     2009-425 students participated 3

STRATEGIES:

Promote a comprehensive learning experience that combines classroom instruction with service learning, experiential learning, and extracurricular activities to produce informed, globally-invested citizens who contribute in meaningful personal and professional ways to the global community.

Category 1: Student Achievement and Success 1B: Enhance the Quality of Instruction, Learning Resources, and Support Services available to students.

SRU Goal:   Slippery Rock University will continuously improve the quality and value of its academic degrees, intellectual products and programs.

ACTION:     Slippery Rock University faculty and staff will collaborate to create learning opportunities for students that applies their classroom knowledge to real world situations.
MEASURE:  Number of opportunities created for students

SRU’s Adapted Physical Activity Grant Funded Program

The “I Can Do It, You Can Do It” Program (ICDI) is a contract funded for three years beginning September 30, 2008 through September 29, 2011 in the amount of $849,997.50 to Slippery Rock University by the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. The purpose of the ICDI program is to match mentors (college-age healthy adults) with children, adolescents, and adults with disabilities (mentees) to encourage regular physical activity and improved nutrition behaviors. This program’s strength lies in leveraging community resources from a variety of service agencies, community recreation facilities, and county health services. Slippery Rock University’s Adapted Physical Activity program serves as the project host to provide technical assistance and development to the nine sites as they begin their own ICDI programs. SRU’s APA program funded the nine most competitive proposals. The sites include: SRU, State University of New York – Cortland; James Madison University, VA; University of North Carolina, Wilmington; Miami-Dade Public School District, FL; Tennessee Tech University, TN; University of Wisconsin – La Crosse; Splore Special Recreation Center, UT; and California State University, Chico. 326 student mentors at SRU reported significant improvement of their knowledge of mentoring (observation, feedback, and goal-setting with an individual with a disability) as a result of their active participation in the ICDI program. In addition to improving their knowledge, students reported a significant improvement in their skills such as promoting independence, communicating, and feeling comfortable with a person who has a disability. 1058 mentors served mentees and their respective communities throughout the country. (Spring 2009-Spring 2010) 2009-2010

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: Action statement targeting an application of classroom knowledge to "real world situations" seems to provide an opportunity to measure outcomes for students "who contribute in meaningful personal and professional ways to the global community." However, it does not currently track this activity.

  • Support classroom instruction which seeks to develop knowledge, skills, and values related to global issues across all academic disciplines.
  • Dedicate resources to and encourage participation in scholarly and professional development opportunities on regional, national, and global scales through participation in professional conferences, student-faculty research, specialized training, and other opportunities.

 

Category: 1 – Student Achievement and Success – 1B Quality Instruction, Resource, and Support (UPP)

SRU Goal:   Student Achievement and Success – Provide all students with opportunities leading to active citizenship, social responsibility, and lifelong learning.
ACTION      The university will enhance the research and scholarly growth of students through opportunities to present at state, regional, national, and international professional conferences within their disciplines. (AA)
BASELINE    195 students presented in 2003-2004
UPDATE      271 students presented in 2009-2010, up 5% from 2008-2009

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: SAP item measures a portion of the Trend 1 Strategy statement (professional conferences), but does not address other scholarly and professional development opportunities.

  • Support the development of new and existing service learning opportunities--such as AmeriCorps, Carebreaks, and other programs--that engage students as active participants in regional, national, and global communities.
  • Develop new and existing opportunities for internships, travel, and study abroad programs across state and national borders through academic departments, colleges, and administrative offices such as the Office of International Services.

Category: Academic Quality – External Recognition/Program Quality

SRU Goal: Learning Environment – Academic Quality D: Create environment conducive for our students’ growth and development in areas of responsibility, accountability, and professional preparation.

ACTION     Provide resources for the Frederick Douglas Institute, Honors Program, and International Initiatives to expand unique educational opportunities available to students and faculty. (AA)
MEASURE  The quantity and quality of involvement by students in these programs; number of students in honors courses, number of students going abroad, and types of programs offered through the Frederick Douglas Institute.(AA)
BASELINE  International Initiatives -175 in 11 courses; 272 Study Abroad students (2002-2003); Honors (no entry); Frederick Douglas Program (no entry).
UPDATE    Frederick Douglass Institute – 9 programs, 493 participants (2009); 12 programs, 575 participants (2008); 8 programs, 390 participants (2007); 10 programs, 434 participants (2006); Honors Program – 266 participants (2009); 230 participants (2008); 235 participants (2007); 240 participants (2006); International Services – 426 students overseas, 18 countries, 112 studied abroad (2009) 333 students overseas, 20 countries, 112 studied abroad (2008) 331 students overseas, 20 countries, 122 studied abroad (2007); 356 students overseas, 21 countries, 173 studied abroad (2006). (2009)

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: Action goal supports a partial measurement of the Trend 1 Strategy statement--specifically, travel and study abroad programs.

  • Expand opportunities and dedicate resources for international students to study at Slippery Rock University through administrative offices such as the Office of International Services.

Category: Enrollment Management – 2- Student Achievement/Success NAS

SRU Goal: Enrollment Management - Student Success C: Increase the size and quality of the student body

ACTION    Support the recommendations from Slippery Rock University’s Enrollment Services Division’s Strategic Enrollment Plan. Goals are: 1) Headcount enrollment will increase by 1%; 2) Credit hours generated will increase by 1%; 3) Out-of-state headcount enrollments will increase; 4) African-American and Hispanic first-time full-time headcounts will increase. (AA)
MEASURE  Headcount enrollments and credit hours generated in fall terms
BASELINE  1) Headcount enrollment: 7789 (Fall 2003); 2) Credit hours generated: 106,334 (Fall 2003); 3) Out-of-state enrollment: 327 (Fall 2003); and 4) African-American and Hispanic first-time full-time headcounts: 86 and 13, respectively (Fall 2003) 2003
UPDATE    1. Fall 2009 Headcount enrollment 8,648, up by 2.3% from Fall 2008, up by 11.0% since baseline year. 2. Credit hours generated:
120,508, up by 1.9% since Fall 2008, up 13.3% since baseline year.
3. Out-of-state enrollment: 773, up 7.5% from Fall 2008 (719). 4.
African American and Hispanic first-time, full-time headcounts; 97
African American, up 18.3% from Fall 2008, up 12.8% from
baseline year and 24 Hispanic, up 9.1% from Fall 2008, up 84.6%
from baseline year. 2009

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: SAP Action Statement measures include international students among the headcount for "out-of-state enrollment." The subcommittee recommends that international students be counted separately.

  • Utilize and financially support the programming of the university’s student organizations--including the SRU Internations Club, Building Bridges, SRU's Forgotten Angels, and other honorary, preprofessional and special interest organizations--to promote academic and intellectual engagement with issues of regional, national, and global importance.
  • Continue to provide support for academic and cultural arts activities--such as the Kaleidoscope Festival, Luna Fest, and fine arts programs--that foster awareness of regional, national, and global issues and cultures.
  • Develop new and existing grant and other funding sources in support of classroom, experiential, service, and extracurricular learning opportunities that promote engagement with global issues, through programs and offices such as Grants and Sponsored Research and the Foundation for SRU.

Category: 1B –Quality, Instruction, Resources and Support 1- Student Achievement/Success UPP

SRU Goal: Provide all students with opportunities leading to active citizenship, social responsibility, and lifelong learning.


ACTION     Fund student/faculty research grants to encourage collaborative one-on-one learning. Goal is to increase participation in the Research Symposium. (AA)
MEASURE  The amount of grant money available to the program and the number of student/faculty research participants.
BASELINE  1) University contributed $38,988 for faculty/student research projects (2003 Symposium).
2) 91 people presented 44 projects, 61 students (42 undergrads; 19 graduates), 23 faculty, 2 staff, 5 outside faculty. (2003 Symposium)
UPDATE    1) University contributed $35,000 for the faculty/student research grants. College of Health, Environment, and Science contributed an additional $14,516 (2009-2010) Academic Affairs contributed $5,000 toward 10 grant awards of $500 each to student researchers. 155 people presented 74 projects; 104 students (95 undergraduates and 9 graduates), 51 faculty advisors. Under the guidance of the Director of the Library, the Research Symposium is showing a 8% increase in participation (also an increase of 72% in presentations over 2008-09 although a decrease of 18 students participating due to a smaller number of group projects represented.) (2009-2010)

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: This SAP Action Statement measures university grants in support of the Research Symposium--only one of many possible opportunities suggested by the Trend 1 Strategy Statement.

  • Enhance Student Life Division services through purposefully designed co-curricular experiences, environments, and services.
    • Develop living and learning opportunities that are integrated through residential programs such as community development activities and Living-Learning Communities to encourage global citizenship and the interaction of domestic and international students across national, cultural, and experiential lines.
    • Enhance Student Life services through an integration of the Learning Reconsidered model with assessment tools which focus on university learning outcomes.
    • Engage all students in the development of leadership skills required in the context of global trends through programs such as the Compass Leadership Program, the Freshman Leadership Scholars Program, centralized Peer Leader Campus Wide Training, Club & Organization Student Leader Training, and community service opportunities.


Category: Student Achievement and Success – Leadership and Lifelong Learning
SRU Goal: Learning Environment – Academic Quality D: Create environment conducive for our students’ growth and development in areas of responsibility, accountability, and professional preparation.


ACTION     Develop a student leadership certification process to ensure that all students meet basic competencies in leadership skills and to provide advanced certification for those who choose to pursue additional experience. (SL)
MEASURE  Increase number of students participating in the advanced leadership certification process.
BASELINE  Certification process does not exist. (Fall 2003)
UPDATE     Currently, 1928 students are enrolled in the Compass Leadership Program (22% of the undergraduate population), which is a 6.8% increase from last year. 850 students received Level 1 Certification, compared to 835 last year; 56 students received Level 2 Certification, compared to 33 last year; 12 students were paired with faculty/staff mentors and received Level 3 certification compared with 8 students last year. (Spring 2010)

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: SAP Action Statement only addresses a portion of the action suggested by the Trend 1 Strategy Statement. Subcommittee recommends additional statements to measure other leadership development programs and accommodation of global leadership competencies within the structure of the Compass Leadership Program.

OBJECTIVE: Slippery Rock University will be recognized for undergraduate and graduate academic programs that support the global community.

ACTION:     Develop interdisciplinary certificate and degree programs that emphasize regional, national and global competencies such as communication, critical thinking and problem solving, values and ethics, and social responsibility.
MEASURE:  The quantity of opportunities available and participation rates.
BASELINE:  Establish baseline fall 2011.
ACTION:     Expand unique educational opportunities through the Frederick Douglass Institute..
MEASURE:  Number of programs and participants.
BASELINE:  2006: 10 programs, 434 participants.
UPDATE:    2009: 9 programs, 493 participants. 8

STRATEGIES:

Safeguard a core liberal education program that provides the breadth of knowledge, skills, and values expected of an educated person in our global community.

Category: Academic Quality – Curriculum (NAS)

SRU Goal: Curriculum – Enhance and develop curriculum to demonstrate learning outcomes consistent with university goals.

ACTION     Revise the general education curriculum to achieve the desired outcomes as specified in the catalog. (AA)
MEASURE  The general education program will demonstrate that it is producing the learning outcomes consistent with the goals of the university.

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: The Liberal Studies curriculum already addresses global competencies in many of its goal and enrichment areas, including Global Community; Challenges of the Modern Age; and Human Institutions and Interpersonal Relationships.

  • Support the development of new and existing academic programs with regional, national, and global perspectives, seeking accreditation where appropriate.
    • Develop interdisciplinary certificate and degree programs that emphasize regional, national and global competencies such as communication, critical thinking and problem solving, values and ethics, and social responsibility.
    • Refine and strengthen academic programs that will specifically address the needs of changing population dynamics of the 21st century, including communication, science and technology, the use of natural resources, multiculturalism and languages, diversity, the arts and humanities, health and human services, business, and education.

Category: Retention/Graduation – 2- Student Achievement/Success NAS

SRU Goal: Enrollment Management – Student Success C: Increase retention and graduation rates

ACTION     Increase recruitment of majors of first-time full-time students in the Health, Environment, and Sciences.
MEASURE  Review of percent of new enrollment for the College of Health, Environment, and Science. (AA)

Category: 3 – High Need Academic Programs – Science and Technology Programs (NAS) 9

SRU Goal: Expand Programs of High Need for Commonwealth – High-Need Academic Programs C: Increase undergraduate and graduate students majoring in high need areas of employment.

ACTION: Increase students majoring in science and technology.
MEASURE Number of students enrolled in science and technology areas using CIP codes 03, 14, 15, 26, 40, 48 and 45072 for science.

Category: 3 – High Need Academic Programs – Healthcare-related Programs (NAS)

SRU Goal: Expand Programs of High Need for Commonwealth – High-Need Academic Programs C: Increase undergraduate and graduate students majoring in high need areas of employment.

ACTION:     Increase undergraduate and graduate students majoring in high need areas of healthcare. (AA)
MEASURE   Number of students enrolled in high need area of healthcare using CIP codes for healthcare

Category: Science and Technology programs – 3 – High Need Academic Programs (NAS)

SRU Goal: Expand Programs of High Need for Commonwealth – High-Need Academic Programs C: Increase undergraduate and graduate students majoring in high need areas of employment.

ACTION     Market and expand the Physical Therapy 3+3 program, the Youngstown State University 3+2 program in engineering and Doctor of Pharmacy 3+3 program with LECOM. (AA)
MEASURE  The number of students enrolled in science programs.

Category: 3 – Commonwealth Service – 3D – Graduate Programs ( NAS)

Student Achievement and Success – Retention and Graduation (UPP)

SRU Goal: Expand Programs of High Need for Commonwealth – High-Need Academic Programs C: Increase undergraduate and graduate students majoring in high need areas of employment.

ACTION     Increase enrollment in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program (AA)
MEASURE  Total DPT enrollment in fall

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: Student recruitment in these high-need areas of employment is only one way to "refine and strengthen academic programs that will specifically address the needs of changing population dynamics of the 21st century." The subcommittee recommends that these and other academic programs address global concerns within their curriculum or that competencies be developed.

  • Invest in instructional and laboratory facilities and state-of-the-art technologies that provide effective and flexible learning environments in support of the development of professional competencies that meet the needs of regional, national, and global populations.
  • Capitalize on the skills and experiences of international faculty through innovative and flexible academic and co-curricular educational opportunities.
  • Enhance global career exploration and development among upper level undergraduates, graduate students and alumni through academic departments, Student Life programs, the Office of Career Services, the Office of International Services, and Alumni Relations.
  • Develop targeted funding sources in support of undergraduate and graduate academic programs that support the needs of the global community.
  • Develop new and existing communication tools to purposefully communicate these efforts on national and international levels, and to internal and external audiences, including the media.

OBJECTIVE: Slippery Rock University will be recognized as a preferred workplace where faculty and staff participate in professional, scholarly, and personal growth opportunities that support engagement in and competencies related to global trends.

ACTION:     The University will provide a climate of inclusiveness, sensitivity and appreciation for diversity through formal programs of diversity training.
MEASURE:  A minimum of 10 percent of employees will participate annually; number of programs provided.
BASELINE:  2003: 106 employees (11.75 percent).
UPDATE:     2009: 329 employees (34 percent).

STRATEGIES:

  • Promote a workplace environment that recognizes, supports, and promotes an engagement in regional, national, and global issues.
  • Expand efforts to recruit and retain employees who bring a diversity of personal and professional experience to the university through the efforts of academic departments, colleges, and administrative offices such as Human Resources and the Office of Diversity and Equal Opportunity.

Category: 2 – University and System Excellence 2B – Diversity and Excellence (UPP)

SRU Goal: Diversity – Establish and continually promote an accepting climate for diversity on campus.

ACTION     The University will continue to hire women and employees of color in greater percentage to the overall university percentage for each sector. (FA)
BASELINE: Between October 31, 2003 and May 31, 2004: Hired 17 tenure-track faculty - 5 persons of color and 11 women; 2 coaches - 1 person of color and 1 woman.
The university employs 12.2% people of color and 51.7% women. (2003)
UPDATE     Between October 31, 2009 and June 30, 2010: Hired 2 tenure track faculty, 0 persons of color and 1 woman (50%); 1 regular, full-time coach, 0 persons of color and 1 woman (50%); 3 regular, full-time staff, 0 persons of color and 2 women (66%); 0 regular, full-time managers; 1 regular, full-time professional staff, 1 person of color (100%) and 1 woman (100%). As of June 30, 2010, the University employs 12.3% persons of color and 53.3% women. (2009)

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: This SAP Action Statement is related to the Trend 1 Strategic Action Statement but limits the measure to diversity based on race and gender. The Subcommittee would suggest the measure be expanded to include recruitment of temporary or permanent international faculty, or faculty who bring a diversity of cultural backgrounds to campus.

  • Support ongoing personal and professional development of faculty and staff in competencies related to global trends, including communication, science and technology, the use of natural resources, multiculturalism and languages, diversity, the arts and humanities, health and human services, business, and education.
    • Create and financially support international professional development opportunities, such as exchange placements with international institutions, for faculty and staff.
    • Promote opportunities for faculty to participate in research that specifically targets global needs associated with changing population dynamics.
    • Support opportunities for faculty and staff to engage in continued education and professional development experiences related to global trends.

 

Category: 2 – University and System Excellence 2B – Diversity and Excellence (UPP)

SRU Goal: Establish and continually promote an accepting climate for diversity on campus.

ACTION    The University will provide a climate of inclusiveness, sensitivity and appreciation for diversity through formal programs of diversity training that reaches minimally 10% of employees each year. (FA)
BASELINE 106 employees (11.75%) participated in 13 diversity training programs. (2003)
UPDATE    329 employees (34%) participated in 32 diversity training programs, a 36.2% increase compared to 2008: 210 employees (21%) participated in 30 diversity programs. (2009)

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: “Formal programs of diversity training” are only one way in which the university could meet this Trend 1 Strategic Statement.

  • Develop public and private funding sources to support faculty and staff in professional, scholarly, and personal growth related to global trends, such as the Faculty Professional Development Council and other grant programs.

Category: Private Giving / Endowment Growth (required) – 5 – Resource Development and Utilization (NAS)

SRU Goal: External Resource Development and Utilization – Giving and Endowment

ACTION     Faculty grant activity through support of Grants Office.
MEASURE  Increase in grants externally funded.(AA)
BASELINE  Grants 2003: Federal: 8; State: 17; Other and Private: 8
UPDATE     Grants 2009: Federal: 8; State: 21; Other and Private: 27

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: “Faculty grant activity through support of Grants Office” is only one way in which the university could meet this Trend 1 Strategic Statement.

OBJECTIVE: Slippery Rock University will provide educational opportunities to existing and emerging nontraditional learning communities, including alumni, community members, and retirees.

ACTION:     Expand distance education programs and online classes to accommodate working adults.
MEASURE:  Number of programs offered and participation rates.
BASELINE:  2008: 54 Web-based sections; 1,195 enrollment.
UPDATE:     2009: 83 Web-based sections; 1,799 enrollment.
UPDATE:     2010: 107 Web-based sections; 2,275 enrollment.

STRATEGIES:

  • Expand distance education programs and on-site class schedules that accommodate working adults.
  • Develop new and existing continuing education opportunities, including certification and degree programs, for nontraditional students at all stages of their professional lives.
  • Support educational programs for retirees such as the Institute for Learning in Retirement.
  • Explore partnerships with organizations serving the needs of nontraditional learners worldwide.
  • Promote alumni relationships that enhance the university's educational mission on regional, national, and global levels.

 

SUBCOMMITTEE NOTE: Nontraditional learning communities are addressed in the SAP only peripherally as a public for RLA services. 13

SUBCOMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION FOR ACTION STATEMENTS RELATED TO TREND 1 STRATEGIES:

  • Action statements as they exist in the SAP do not nicely fit the strategies presented in the Trend 1 Subcommittee Report, although a moderate correlation can be drawn. The subcommittee recommends a new SAP category or goal statement capturing global competencies through targeted measures of:
  • General global competency/experience through activities beyond established curricular requirements for all students. This competency/experience could be self-reported through co-curricular transcript, or more formally adopted by the university as an outcome-driven competency. Included in this competency/experience would be service learning, exchange programs, etc.
  • Resource allocation to support faculty research and professional development activities targeted toward global issues.
  • Efforts targeted toward recruitment of temporary or permanent international faculty, or faculty who bring a diversity of cultural backgrounds to campus. Included in this measure would be exchange placements for faculty and staff.
  • Curricular efforts which prioritize global competencies. The Subcommittee feels that the development of “interdisciplinary certificate and degree programs that emphasize regional, national and global competencies such as communication, critical thinking and problem solving, values and ethics, and social responsibility” (11) is a valuable—and viable—endeavor which could capitalize on existing resources, faculty expertise, and courses which highlight issues and skills related to this global trend.                                           

1 Data quoted in this section are from the Center for Strategic and International Studies, “Revolution One: Population,” gsi.csis.org.

                                                                                                       12-3-10

 

Steering Committee  

President Cheryl J. Norton
Dr. Philip Way
Ms. Molly Mercer
Dr. Robert Watson
Ms. Barbara Ender
Ms. Rita Abent
Ms. Tina Moser
Mr. Eliott Baker
Dr. Nancy Barta-Smith
Ms. Carrie Birckbichler
Dr. John Bonando
Dr. Patrick Burkhart (APSCUF)
Dr. Patti Campbell
Mr. Herb Carlson
Dr. Jerry Chmielewski
Mr. Rogers Clements (SGA)
Dr. Cornelius Cosgrove
Ms. Lorraine Craven
Dr. Keith Dils

Dr. Thomas Flynn 
Dr. Susan Hannam
Ms. Mary Hennessey
Dr. Athula Herat
Ms. Samantha Kelly
Ms. Mary Ann King
Mr. Paul Lueken
Dr. Jeffrey Lynn
Ms. Holly McCoy
Ms. Lynne Motyl
Dr. Randall Nichols
Dr. Paula Olivero
Ms. Deb Pincek
Dr. Katrina Quinn

Mr. Regis Schiebel
Ms. Kelly Sladden (ARHS)
Dr. Langdon Smith
Dr. Steven Strain
Ms. Melissa Teodoro
Mr. Philip Tramdack
Dr. Eva Tsuquiashi-Daddesio
Mr. Tom Watson (AFSCME)
Dr. Amanda Yale