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 Strategic Planning Trend 3 

 

SPOTLIGHT

 

Trend Three:  The need to understand other cultures.

The pace of cultural change has accelerated at local, national, and global scales in recent years. Attitudes and behaviors of ever smaller and larger social, political and economic groups need to be considered. Individuals increasingly belong to a variety of intertwined and interdependent groups within which they will live and work. The complex world this creates makes it crucial for students to understand the myriad relationships among these groups, both domestic and global. Trends to consider while creating pertinent educational strategies include:

  • Powerful political agendas fueled by economic, cultural, and social differences promote armed conflicts all over the world at the onset of the 21st Century. For example, failing or rogue states are not the only unsettling factors. The ongoing shift in relative wealth and economic power from West to East will also create frictions between rising and declining superpowers.
  • Global inequality, the widening gap between the rich and the poor, intransigent and intolerant belief systems as well as misunderstood human conditions or practices continue to generate unproductive cultural tensions between individuals as well as  societies .
  • Instantaneous communication technologies have reduced the traditional geographic barriers for people on the planet and will become cheaper and more accessible thus creating more opportunities for cultural exchanges. New technologies will continue to create dramatic changes in the way we communicate, socialize, do business, and teach our students.
  • The diversity of populations within countries will continue to accelerate and along with simultaneous waves of globalized culture will erode traditional notions of national identity, heritage and culture.

Goals and Actions

SRU students in 2025 will have to contend with complex cultural trends that will affect their personal and professional lives. SRU has identified the following strategic goals in relation to the trend identified as “The need to understand other cultures.” These strategic goals for 2025 for Slippery Rock University are in alignment with PASSHE’s diversity related strategies and with SRU University-Wide Outcomes.

Goal 1 - Prepare all SRU students to be successful professionals for the culturally diverse world of the year 2025 and beyond

  • Action 1. Create, improve, and maintain programs, co-curricular activities, and extracurricular offerings as well as courses related to the exploration and analysis of cultural factors (University Outcome – Aesthetic perception and Ability);
    • Measure The quantity and quality of student involvement as provided by assessments in all areas related to diversity and inclusion (i.e. number of minority students by category, number and attendance to diversity related events, number of diversity related courses)
    • Baseline Current level of participation as provided by existing measures in programs offered by the Frederick Douglass Institute and International Services
    • Update We have had a steady level of participation in the Frederick Douglass Institute programs since 2004. Since then we have offered between 8 and 12 programs and between 390 and 575 students have participated in them. Since 2006 International Services has had an increase in the number of students overseas from 331 to 426 but has had a decrease in students studying abroad from 173 to 112.
  • Action 2. Establish and secure funding for ongoing and new curricular initiatives that will encourage the respectful, intelligent, and productive study of cultural factors across disciplines in an increasingly complex and interdependent world (University Outcome - Professional Proficiency);
    • Measure The quantity and quality of international teaching grants
    • Baseline Number of faculty awarded curriculum related grants for international projects. Number of international student recruitment projects or international curriculum proposals such as international student teaching.
    • Update President’s International Faculty Development Grants are awarded to an average of 10 faculty every year, 2011 International Bridge program (Pilot), International high school recruitment in Japan, China, Korea and Peru. International Student Teaching in Peru.
  • Action 3. Make students accountable for acting in a responsible, inclusive, and respectful way with unfamiliar cultures in their own country and in the world by supporting student initiatives that promote the understanding of and communication with people of diverse cultures (University Outcome – Communication);
    • Measure The quantity and quality of student international programming
    • Baseline Number of international or diverse cultural activities created by students
    • Update Number of international and diversity related student organizations (Asian Studies Club, French Club, Spanish Club, Japan Club, Arabic Club, Internations Club, LGBTA Organization, Black Action Society, SOL, Latino Student Organization, Korean Tiger Club, American Sign Language, Sister to Sister, Building Bridges)
  • Action 4 Require all undergraduates to participate in an international program and to learn a world language other than their own
    • Measure Establish a world language degree requirement with at least a one semester college level proficiency.
    • Baseline Level of proficiency acquired by the majority in each of the different languages.

Goal 2 – Build a community that works together in the promotion of an evolving, complex, and diverse campus (University Outcome – Social Awareness and Civic Responsibility).

  • Action 1 Create a central organization to support the university’s efforts, at all levels, to maximize the benefits of cultural diversity among students and faculty, as well as professional and administrative employees;
    • Measure Appointment of a Senior Officer for Diversity and Inclusion as well as four presidential commissions on Disabilities, LBGTQI, Race and Diversity, and Women’s Issues
    • Baseline Campus Climate Community Survey results, number of campus programs interacting with presidential commissions and Senior Officer for Diversity and Inclusion.
  • Action 2 Integrate diversity of intellectual and cultural perspectives by promoting progressive inclusiveness not only in the academic area but also in the infrastructure (financial, human, technical) of the university as a whole.
    • Measure Increase the numbers of underrepresented student populations as well as the number of faculty and staff that represent diversity and inclusion
    • Baseline Headcount of diverse students, faculty and staff.
    • Update Increased diversity of African-American and Hispanic students on campus. 524 – Fall 2009, up by 1.7% from Fall 2008. 515 – 2008, 488 – 2007, 454 – 2006, 428 – 2005, 397 – 2004, 348 – 2003. (2009) Between October 31, 2009 and June 30, 2010: Hired 2 tenure track faculty, 0 persons of color and 1 woman (50%); 1 regular, full-time coach, 0 persons of color and 1 woman (50%); 3 regular, full-time staff, 0 persons of color and 2 women (66%); 0 regular, full-time managers; 1 regular, full-time professional staff, 1 person of color (100%) and 1 woman (100%). As of June 30, 2010, the University employs 12.3% persons of color and 53.3% women. (2009)
  • Action 3 Strive to improve and strengthen cultural programs and services that address the needs and concerns of the evolving diversity of staff and students as well as the community at large;
    • Measure Increase the quantity and quality of programs that address diversity issues within the community
    • Baseline  Number and variety of existing diversity and inclusion programs organized by faculty through discipline related activities and staff through different offices (Multicultural programs, Chinese Cultural Center, Middle East Studies Center, Hispanic/Latino Cultures Series, Autism Conference, International Arts and Cultures Series, etc)
  • Action 4 Create programs that foster a welcoming university environment to attract, recruit, integrate and retain faculty, staff, and students of diverse cultural backgrounds; and
    • Measure  Increase the quantity and quality of programs that address diversity issues within the community
    • Baseline Number and variety of new diversity and inclusion programs
  • Action 5 Work towards achieving a shared understanding and increased sensitivity to the dynamics of culturally charged issues and the consequences of individual behavior. 
    • Measure Increase participation in diversity training programs
    • Baseline Percentage of employees who participate in diversity training programs
    • Update Since 2003 the university has increased participation in diversity training programs  from 8.63% at its lowest to 34% participation in 2009.
  • Action 6 Strongly encourage faculty and staff participation in curricular, co-curricular, or extracurricular activities that will put them in direct contact with the widest possible range of diverse cultural activities and/or experiences thus increasing their level of cultural understanding and ability to lead students by example.
    • Measure Funding offered to support diverse cultural activities.
    • Baseline International Professional Development grants, diversity grants,

Goal 3 – Serve the community to better connect with the world by promoting cultural awareness that will lead towards peace as well as fair and just economic opportunities for all (University Outcome – Values and Ethics).

  • Action 1 Create educational alliances with businesses and organizations in the area whose goals would be to function effectively in a multicultural society and a globalized economy through the improvement of cultural awareness;
    • Measure Quantity and quality of participation in international organizations interested in global issues.
    • Baseline Slippery Rock University is a member of Japan Society, World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, The Cranberry Sister Cities Association with Haiyang in China among others.
  • Action 2 Promote the creation of partnerships between the university and international organizations or other multicultural educational institutions and organizations so that SRU students can learn and serve beyond the campus boundaries; and
    • Measure Number of study abroad agreements with institutions throughout the world for study abroad programs, student teaching and student and faculty exchange agreements
    • Baseline All programs offered through the International Services Office.
  • Action 3 Promote the creation of internship opportunities related to diversity issues available to students in all fields. The interns’ goals would be to use their acquired knowledge to become participants in workable solutions to cultural, social and/or economic challenges (e.g.) (University Outcomes – Global Interdependence, Personal Development, Professional Proficiency).
    • Measure Quantity and quality of programs such as inexpensive computers for alphabetization in poor areas of the world, training programs for sustainability to reverse current damage to the planet, literacy training for women and girls, universal design projects for curricular development in k-12, etc.
    • Baseline Internships such as the one in Ghana through the Women’s studies program

Appendix 1

Currently identified issues, concepts and categories related to the need to understand other cultures that have been taken into consideration - not as an exhaustive list - in the drafting of goals and strategies for this trend of the SRU Strategic Planning for 2025.

1.       Strategic issues related to the need to understand other cultures as well as our own.

a.     Discrimination

b.    Stereotyping

c.     Violence

d.    Social injustice

e.     Misperception and misunderstanding

f.      Breakdown in communication

2.       Strategic concepts that can help to understand other cultures as well as our own.

a.         Diversity

b.         Inclusion

c.         Respect

d.         Acceptance

e.         Pluralism

f.          Multiculturalism

g.         Global citizenship

h.         Social justice

i.          Globalization

j.          Recognition of the inherent value of other cultures and people

3.       Strategic categories linked to human characteristics to be studied

a.     Marital/partnered status

b.    National, regional origin/geographic background

c.     National, racial/ethnic or cultural identity

d.    Religious identity

e.     Socio-economic status

f.      Ability/Disability (intellectual, learning, physical)

g.    Level of education

h.    Language(s) spoken

i.      Physical appearance

j.      Age

k.     Gender identity and expression

l.      Learning style

m.   Political affiliation

n.    Sexual orientation

o.    Leadership style

Appendix 2

Existing SRU resources related to diversity can be classified as follows:

  • Programs

a.     Stand-alone programs.  They are independent of specific classes, and are not necessarily extra-curricular programs either.  Examples might be the Asian Studies Program, the Women's Center, the Honors Program, the Frederick Douglass Institute, the International Initiatives Office or the Office of Multicultural Programs. 

b.     Co-curricular programs.  These are programs that are specifically designed to compliment courses.  This might include international spring break seminars, service learning programs that are tied to classes, music, theater, or dance performances that are part of classes etc.

c.     Extra-curricular programs.  These are programs that generate lots of activities in support of student learning and cultural enhancement, but that are not tied to specific classes.  This might include student clubs and organizations; the three President’s Commissions (Race and Ethnic Diversity, Women, and LGBT), the International Arts and Cultures Series, The Hispanic/Latino Cultures Series, The Infusing Diversity into the Curriculum Committee, The Presidential Taskforce for Cultural Awareness and maybe even the History Department's weekly film series. The creation of the position of Senior Officer for Diversity & Inclusion has provided an organizing entity that gives the institution the means to better coordinate all efforts in this area.

  • Courses. Most of the courses in the Liberal Studies Global Community, Human Institutions and Interpersonal Relationships, the Arts and Challenges of the Modern Age blocks enhance cultural understanding.  Furthermore, the Infusing Diversity into the Curriculum initiative promotes pertinent course changes.  The list below in not exhaustive list of courses with a cultural diversity component because departments are gradually creating new courses and revising existing ones. All make a contribution to the goal of enabling our students to understand and live in a rich, complex, and interdependent world.

 

_ G&ES 100 Discover Geography
_ G&ES 105 World Regional Geography
_ G&ES 107 Developed World
_ G&ES 109 Developing World
_ HIST 151 Ancient and Medieval World
_ HIST 152 Rise of the Modern World
_ HIST 153 Twentieth Century World
_ MODL 105 Intro to Asian Civilizations
_ MODL (All Language and Culture courses)

_ POLS 103 International Relations
_ PROF 130 Dynamics of Global Commerce
_ PROF 202 Intro to Anthropology
_ SOWK/CRIM 105 Human Diversity

_ COMM 217 Intercultural Communication
_ ECON 326 International Economics
_ ECON 408 Development Economics
_ G&ES 135 Environmental Problems
_ G&ES 201 Latin America & the Caribbean
_ G&ES 204 Post-Soviet Union
_ G&ES 242 Geography of Religion
_ G&ES 303 Asia
_ G&ES 308 Europe
_ G&ES 309 Africa
_ HIST 233 African American History to 1876
_ HIST 234 African American History Since 1876
_ HIST 305 Russia to 1855
_ HIST 306 Russia Since 1855
_ HIST 319 History of Women to 1750
_ HIST 320 History of Women from 1750 to Present
_ HIST 322 Germany in the 20th Century
_ HIST 330 Warfare in the 20th Century
_ HIST 331 England to 1689
_ HIST 332 England Since 1689
_ HIST 337 Indians of the United States
_ HIST 351 Latin America to 1830
_ HIST 352 Latin America Since 1830
_ HIST 362 Africa North of Zambezi
_ HIST 363 Southern Africa
_ HIST 370 History and the Bible
_ HIST 376 Modern Japan
_ HIST 380 Egyptology
_ HIST 386 Modern China History
_ HIST 422 Greece and Rome
_ HIST 424 Middle Ages
_ HIST 427 19th Century Europe
_ HIST 462 Contemporary Middle East
_ HONR 386 Great Books-Global Community
_ PHIL 140 World Religions
_ PHIL 343 Asian Philosophy
_ POLS 220 Foreign Policy
_ POLS 263 Intro to Comparative Politics
_ POLS 331 Seminar Japanese Politics
_ POLS 365 Internat. Political Economy
_ POLS 366 Seminar in Chinese Politics
_ POLS 367 National and International Security
_ POLS 371 Politics in Asia
_ PROF 106 Race and Ethnic Diversity
_ PROF 212 Archaeology/World Prehistory
_ PROF 226 Population and Society
_ PROF 310 Cultural Area Studies

_ HLTH 316 Human Sexuality
_ HONR 387 Great Books Human Institutions
_ MS 100 The American Military Experience
_ PHIL 171 Philosophy of Human Existence
_ PHIL 331 Social and Political Philosophy
_ PHIL 335 Philosophy of Law and Justice
_ PHIL 341 Philosophy of Religion
_ PHIL 375 Existentialism & Phenomena
_ POLS 224 Civil Liberties
_ POLS 255 Intro to Public Policy
_ POLS 327 Public Opinion & Political Attitudes
_ POLS 341 Classic Political Thought
_ POLS 343 Modern Political Thought
_ POLS 345 Contemporary Political Thought
_ POLS 375 Women & Politics
_ PROF 103 Contemporary Social Problems
_ PROF 105 Economics of Social Issues
_ PROF 304 Urban Sociology
_ PROF 324 The Family
_ PROF 327 Religion & Society
_ PROF 330 Collective Behavior
_ PROF 339 Sex Roles & Society
_ PROF 340 Social Inequality
_ PROF 342 Sociology of Aging

_ PSYC 205 Environmental Psychology
_ PSYC 240 Human Sexual Behavior
_ PSYC 300 Psychology of Gender
_ PSYC 338 Cognitive Psychology
_ PSYC 344 Developmental Psychology
_ PSYC 377 Social Psychology
_ SEFE 280 Cultural Minorities in Education
_ SPED 105 Americans with Disabilities

_ COMM 110 Communication Concepts
_ COMM 362 Mass Media and Society
_ CRIM 205 Intro to Criminology
_ HSA 231 US Healthcare System
_ HLTH 101 Personal Health


_ PROF 321 Minority Groups
_ PROF 322 Ancient Civiliz. of America
_ THEA 249 Asian Theatre and Dance
_ WMST 115 Intro to Women’s Studies

_ BIOL 300 Social & Ethical Issues in Genetics
_ COMM 480 The Communication Age
_ ECON 312 Critical Choices in Health Care Policy
_ ECON 315 Environmental Economics
_ EGEO 368 Women in Science
_ ENGL 410 Literature of the Environment
_ ENVS 440 Science, Technology, & the Environment
_ G&ES 375 Geography of Intolerance
_ GERO 425 Women and Aging
_ HIST 340 / POLS 340 The History and Political Legacies of the Vietnam War
_ HIST 382 Modern Asian Pacific Rim

_ CRIM 333 Crime, Justice & Society
_ HLTH 311 International Health
_ PE 342 Wellness Through Movement
_ PHIL 324 Environmental Ethics
_ PHIL 325 Medical/Health Care Ethics
_ PHIL 326 Business Ethics
_ PHIL 353 Mysticism and Psychic Research
_ POLS 322 The United Nations & International Law
_ POLS 333 The Political Film
_ POLS 348 The Holocaust: Genocide & Political Violence
_ POLS 349 Utopian Experiments Past & Present
_ POLS 354 Seminar in Religion and Politics
_ PREE 341 Challenges to a Sustainable Future
_ PROF 309 Health & Society
_ PROF 325 Social & Ethical Issues in Philanthropy & Fundraising
_ PROF 327 Religion & Society
_ PROF 352 Law and Ethics in the Workplace
_ PROF 360 Women in Asia

_ PROF 441 Terrorism, Law and National Security

_ RUSS 306 20th Century Russian Legacy

_ SEFE 420 American Education in the 21st Century: A Comparative Perspective
_ WMST 415 Feminist Perspectives in the Disciplines
_ PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy
_ PHIL 123 Ethics
_ POLS 105 Intro. to Political Theory
_ PROF 201 Principles of Sociology
_ PROF 250 Intro to Institution & Leadership
_ PSYC 105 Intro. to Psychology

_ HLTH 316 Human Sexuality
_ HONR 387 Great Books Human Institutions
_ MS 100 The American Military Experience
_ PHIL 171 Philosophy of Human Existence
_ PHIL 331 Social and Political Philosophy
_ PHIL 335 Philosophy of Law and Justice
_ PHIL 341 Philosophy of Religion
_ PHIL 375 Existentialism & Phenomena
_ POLS 200 State and Local Government
_ POLS 224 Civil Liberties
_ POLS 255 Intro to Public Policy
_ POLS 327 Public Opinion & Political Attitudes
_ POLS 341 Classic Political Thought
_ POLS 343 Modern Political Thought
_ POLS 345 Contemporary Political Thought
_ POLS 375 Women & Politics
_ PROF 100 Personal Financial Planning
_ PROF 103 Contemporary Social Problems
_ PROF 105 Economics of Social Issues
_ PROF 304 Urban Sociology
_ PROF 324 The Family
_ PROF 327 Religion & Society
_ PROF 330 Collective Behavior
_ PROF 339 Sex Roles & Society
_ PROF 340 Social Inequality
_ PROF 342 Sociology of Aging

_ PSYC 205 Environmental Psychology
_ PSYC 240 Human Sexual Behavior
_ PSYC 300 Psychology of Gender
_ PSYC 338 Cognitive Psychology
_ PSYC 344 Developmental Psychology
_ PSYC 377 Social Psychology

_ PSYC 315, Psychology of Lesbian and Gay Identities

_ PSYC 392 Cross-cultural Psychology
_ SEFE 280 Cultural Minorities in Education
_ SPED 105 Americans with Disabilities

_ ART 225 Overview of Western Art
_ ART 226 Overview of World Art
_ DANC 100 Intro to Dance
_ MUSI 101 Intro to Music
_ THEA 141 Intro to Theatre

_ ART 325 North American Art History
_ ART 335 The Renaissance Tradition
_ ART 345 Foundations of Modern Art
_ ART 355 Early Modern Art
_ ART 365 Art Since 1945
_ COMM 115 / ART 115 Visual Literacy
_ COMM 458 Media Criticism
_ DANC 305 Society and Social Dance
_ DANC 318 Dance History to 1900
_ ENGL 214 Film Analysis

_ ENGL 242 Afro-American Literature
_ ENGL 243 Lit of Women’s Movement
_ ENGL 244 Native American Literature
_ ENGL 248 Eastern Literature
_ ENGL 311 Chaucer
_ ENGL 312 Shakespeare
_ ENGL 314 European Film
_ ENGL 315 Cinematic Review
_ ENGL 317-318 British Literature I & II
_ ENGL 319-320 American Literature I & II
_ ENGL 402 World Literature
_ FREN 320 & 335
_ GERM 210 & 320
_ HONR 385 Great Books-Arts
_ MUSI 102 Intro to World Music
_ MUSI 104 Intro to American Music
_ MUSI 105 Jazz
_ MUSI 273 History of Music I
_ MUSI 278 Lit of American Theatre
_ MUSI 301 Women in Music
_ MUSI 373 History of Music II
_ PHIL 163 Philosophy in Literature
_ PHIL 261 Philosophy in Art

 

February 1, 2011

Steering Committee  

President Cheryl J. Norton
Dr. Philip Way
Ms. Molly Mercer
Dr. Robert Watson
Ms. Barbara Ender
Ms. Rita Abent
Ms. Tina Moser
Mr. Eliott Baker
Dr. Nancy Barta-Smith
Ms. Carrie Birckbichler
Dr. John Bonando
Dr. Patrick Burkhart (APSCUF)
Dr. Patti Campbell
Mr. Herb Carlson
Dr. Jerry Chmielewski
Mr. Rogers Clements (SGA)
Dr. Cornelius Cosgrove
Ms. Lorraine Craven
Dr. Keith Dils

Dr. Thomas Flynn 
Dr. Susan Hannam
Ms. Mary Hennessey
Dr. Athula Herat
Ms. Samantha Kelly
Ms. Mary Ann King
Mr. Paul Lueken
Dr. Jeffrey Lynn
Ms. Holly McCoy
Ms. Lynne Motyl
Dr. Randall Nichols
Dr. Paula Olivero
Ms. Deb Pincek
Dr. Katrina Quinn

Mr. Regis Schiebel
Ms. Kelly Sladden (ARHS)
Dr. Langdon Smith
Dr. Steven Strain
Ms. Melissa Teodoro
Mr. Philip Tramdack
Dr. Eva Tsuquiashi-Daddesio
Mr. Tom Watson (AFSCME)
Dr. Amanda Yale